A Grade II listed seafront building in Great Yarmouth in Norfolk, one of the most endangered buildings in England, is set to undergo some much-needed refurbishment work in order to save it from falling into dilapidation.

According to the BBC, an investor is now being sought by Great Yarmouth Borough Council to help save the building, which was originally erected in Torquay but then transported to Norfolk and reassembled back in 1904 – apparently without a single pane of glass breaking!

It was moved from Torquay to Yarmouth to, as Historic England explains, “lengthen the season with better class visitors and on wet days to provide for 2,000 persons under cover”. A brick-arched entrance porch was later added for a cloakroom and a maple floor laid down for roller skating.

The site was also used for dancing and concerts, with the interior decorated with flower beds, hanging basket displays and trailing plants, as well as an organ above the entrance at the west end.

It was assigned Grade II listed status because it is the last surviving seaside Victorian cast iron and glass winter gardens in the country, is of great architectural interest thanks to its unusual prominent tiered lantern and decorative treatments on the exterior and interior cast iron frame, and because when it was built it was one of the three biggest cast iron and glass seaside winter gardens in England.

Last year, it was featured as one of the top ten endangered buildings of the Victorian and Edwardian periods by the Victorian Society, as well as being on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register.

Council leader Carl Smith said: “We are determined to fix the Winter Gardens and get it back open as an iconic building on the seafront. We’ve got to make it secure, replace the glass and look at the structure.”

It’s not just heritage at risk buildings that need tender loving care from time to time – all buildings will start to show their age unless properly looked after over the years.

Older commercial properties, for example, may well need some help in the near future, so if you’re reaching the end of your tenancy or perhaps moving to a new building, you might want to look for help with dilapidation refurbishment work.

You’ll need to book in for a survey so you can find out what repairs are necessary in order to restore the premises to its former glory. Each part of the site will receive the treatment it needs in order to look as good as new, ready for you to continue using it for years to come.

If you’d like to find out any more about how we can help bring your buildings back from the brink, get in touch with the Elevation Maintenance team today.

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